Afrofuturism and its possibility of elsewhere: The power of political imagination

(Article by Lina Nasr El Hag Ali published on theconversation.com)

Photo of actor Mouna Traoré in ‘Brown Girl Begins’ (2017) directed by Sharon Lewis (photo credit: unknown)

“Pay attention to the visions for the future put forward in today’s world by politicians, intellectuals and scientists:

The development of technologies to sustain human life on other planetsnew digital realities; the altering of human DNA.

Who is this future for?

What is not recognized as possible in our future is equally telling: No substantial strategy to tackle climate change; few equitable responses to the COVID-19 pandemic; no end to the ongoing dispossession of Indigenous lands from South Africa to Canada to Palestine; no basic services to those who live daily without food or clean drinking water, even in the world’s richest countries.”

Source: https://theconversation.com/afrofuturism-and-its-possibility-of-elsewhere-the-power-of-political-imagination-166002

Afrofuturism is a psycho-social-political-spiritual movement because everything we do is social, political, psychological, and spiritual. Imagining ourselves into the future is key to our survival. What political future do you imagine for yourself?

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