The World’s First International Black Heritage Month Connects The African Diaspora To Celebrate Juneteenth (USA) And Windrush Day (UK) Around The World Virtually

(Article by editor on africa.com. Photo credit: editor)

“With a digital media platform that focuses on World Shapers, Afro-Futurism, Cultural Bridge Builders, and much more for 2022. Can you imagine the modern world without the influences of Nelson Mandela, Martin Luther King, Aretha Franklin, Michael Jackson, Beyoncé, Idris Elba, Naomi Campbell, Lewis Hamilton, or Sade? When we look at science and inventions, the contributions by people of color go wide and far from developing mathematics to architecture and much more especially from the continent of Africa…”

Read the entire article: https://bit.ly/3HQIWXX

#xnubiaphi #afrofuturism

What Missy Elliott did for Afrofuturism

(Video by Say It Loud posted on youtube.com. Photo credit: Say It Loud)

“Missy Elliott and her frequent collaborators have produced over two decades of music videos that we are going to attempt to justify as Afrofuturistic work. Grab your inflatable trash bags, as we take a stroll down memory lane…”

Watch the video: https://youtu.be/_NMLz042NHk

#xnubiaphi #afrofuturism

Afrofuturism vs. Africanfuturism

(Article by Alyssa Shotwell on themarysue.com. Photo Credit: Matt Kennedy/Marvel Studios 2018)

“Later this year, the highly anticipated sequel to Black Panther (2018), Black Panther: Wakanda Forever, releases. This will likely mark another big surge in wider public excitement and shared fan art depicting elements of Afrofuturism and Africanfuturism. Despite their similar origins and many cultural ties, these two genres within science fiction and speculative fiction tell very different stories…”

Read the entire article: https://bit.ly/3yve24v

#afrofuturism #xnubiaphi #africanfuturism

An Educational Guide to Afrofuturism

(Event posted on inmenlo.com. Photo Credit: Celia C. Peters)

“An Educational Guide to Afrofuturism” is a multimedia primer on the definition, origins and foundations of Afrofuturism. It explores the cultural phenomenon across its various expressions in art, music, film and fashion, including an introduction to the players whose works comprise the genre. On Wednesday, April 27, from 6:30 to 7:30 pm, resenter Celia C. Peters will provide a multifaceted introduction to what is one of the 21st century’s most powerful cultural juggernauts…”

Read more and register: https://bit.ly/3EL2co2

#xnubiaphi #afrofuturism

What Is Afrofuturism?

Article by Allia Luzong on alittlebithuman.com. Photo Credit: Doja Cat.

Inside this article:

  • Afrofuturism is a sci-fi subgenre that imagines a future through the lens of the African diaspora.
  • Black Panther, the most mainstream Afrofuturistic piece of media, is a great example of the politics and themes that the genre tends to address.
  • Some argue that Afrofuturism is one-dimensional and still centers colonialism and Western oppression, leading to the birth of a second, related genre called African Futurism.
  • A handful of recommendations for you to check out if you want to see more of Afrofuturism and African Futurism.

Read the article: https://bit.ly/3KuiW4A

#xnubiaphi #afrofuturism

Erika Alexander On NFTs Giving Back Black Creative Ownership, Afrofuturism And More

Article by Njera Perkins on shadowandact.com. Photo credit: Maury Phillips.

“Actress Erika Alexander is on a mission to give Black creators their creative control back by way of the latest cryptocurrency innovation. Non-fungible tokens (NFTs) are the newest form of cryptocurrency taking over the digital space, and Alexander is a true believer that they’re the game-changing tool that’s redefining art across literature, entertainment, music and more…”

Read the article: https://bit.ly/3rq46Ef

#xnubiaphi #afrofuturism

Kino Lorber Acquires ‘Neptune Frost’ By Saul Williams And Anisia Uzeyman

Article by Valerie Complex on deadline.com. Photo credit: Chris Schwagga.

“The film takes place amid the hilltops of Burundi, where a collective of computer hackers emerges from a mining community, the result of a romance between a miner and an intersex runaway…” 

Read the article: https://bit.ly/3sGnRdh

#afrofuturism #xnubiaphi

The Second Coming of Octavia E. Butler

Article by Cassie Da Costa on vanityfair.com. Photo credit: Alice Arnold. Illustration by Quinton McMillan.

“The ground Octavia E. Butler covered in her 15 novels and two story collections is traceable—but you need time. In the ’70s, ’80s, and ’90s, when Butler published the bulk of her work, she, Samuel Delany, and Ursula K. Le Guin were the only significant science fiction authors attempting such ideologically ambitious stories within the genre, placing left-of-center national politics and local histories right at the core of their plots…”

Read the article: https://bit.ly/3skI0Fd

#xnubiaphi #wisdomwork

Janelle Monae Is Releasing A Sci-Fi Anthology Book Based On ‘Dirty Computer’

(Article by Aaron Williams on uproxx.com. Photo credit: Getty Image)

“Next year, the Kansas City-born singer will turn that intriguing backstory into a full-on book inspired by her most recent album, 2018’s Dirty Computer. Set for release in April 2022, The Memory Librarian is an anthology of short stories by some of today’s most prominent Afrofuturist authors, telling tales inspired by the overarching Dirty Computer mythology…”

Read the article: https://bit.ly/3dlh1Rl

#afrofuturism #xnubiaphi