Women Who Fly: Nona Hendryx and Afrofuturist Histories

(This essay by Emily Lordi is featured in Boston Review’s new book, Ancestors and posted on bostonreview.net)

Photo: Paula Lobo for The Metropolitan Museum of Art

“A Sun Ra tribute concert by a member of the pathbreaking pop group Labelle leads to reflections on how Black women artists and scientists have often been at the vanguard of their disciplines—though most are still awaiting due recognition. On the last night of Black History Month, February 29, 2020, I attended a concert held in the Temple of Dendur, at New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art—the last such event that I would attend, it turned out, for a very long time.”

Source: http://bostonreview.net/arts-society/emily-lordi-women-who-fly-nona-hendryx-and-afrofuturist-histories

Panel Mania: Infinitum: An Afrofuturist Tale by Tim Fielder

Compiled by Calvin Reid

“Tim Fielder’s new graphic novel Infinitum: An Afrofuturist Tale is ambitious in the extreme. It is an epic adventure and a meta-fictional tale of survival that celebrates the presence of the Black man and Black woman in genre storytelling from the beginning of time until the end of the universe. It’s the story of Aja Oba, an ancient African warlord, who is cursed with immortality after he betrays a vengeful lover who is also a powerful witch. Oba comes to realize he has been transformed into an undying Black storytelling presence and as the millennia accumulate he inserts himself into every great historical narrative from the ancient barbarian wars to the slave trade and Civil Rights Movement to new technological advances, space travel, and the colonization of planets far from earth. In this five-page excerpt, the reader is introduced to Aja Oba and to the beginning of his endless journey through time and storytelling. Infinitum: An Afrofuturist Tale by Tim Fielder will be published by Amistad this month.”

Source: https://www.publishersweekly.com/pw/by-topic/industry-news/comics/article/85352-panel-mania-infinitum-an-afrofuturist-tale-by-tim-fielder.html

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Africanfuturism Defined

“I am an Africanfuturist and an Africanjujuist. Africanfuturism is a sub-category of science fiction. Africanjujuism is a subcategory of fantasy that respectfully acknowledges the seamless blend of true existing African spiritualities and cosmologies with the imaginative.

Reminder: Africa is not a country, it’s a diverse continent. I’m also aware that it’s a construct (and an ethereal thing who travels across space and time); I’m just rolling with it.”

Source: https://nnedi.blogspot.com/2019/10/africanfuturism-defined.html?view=classic

#afrofuturism #blackmusic #blackjesus #blackentrepreneur #blackfuturist #xnubiaphi #afrophysicist #afronaut #afroscientist #afrochemist #afrobotanist #afrotechnology #afroexplorer #afrohorticulturist #blackgenius #blackengineers #NSBE #afroengineers #blacktothefuture #darkmatter #darkscience #theblackvote #afropoliticians #blacksciencefiction #blackspeculativearts #blackownedbanks #blackblueprint #afrofuturistagenda #afrofuturistnews

11 Afrofuturism Books That Blend Science Fiction, Technology, and Black Culture

(Article by  ALLISON INGRUM published on popsugar.com, December 15, 2020)

“As author and scholar Ytasha L. Womack explains, Afrofuturism is an artistic genre that blends imagination, technology, Black cultures, liberation, and mysticism. It is a “way of looking at the future and alternate realities through a Black cultural lens,” including those from Africa and the African diaspora. Typically seen through an artistic aesthetic of music, visual art, dance, film, or literature, Womack also explains that the genre can be a method of self-liberation and healing by using imagination to transcend circumstances and creating agency.”

Source: https://www.popsugar.com/entertainment/best-afrofuturist-books-48048301

#afrofuturism #blackmusic #blackjesus #blackentrepreneur #blackfuturist #xnubiaphi #afrophysicist #afronaut #afroscientist #afrochemist #afrobotanist #afrotechnology #afroexplorer #afrohorticulturist #blackgenius #blackengineers #NSBE #afroengineers #blacktothefuture #darkmatter #darkscience #theblackvote #afropoliticians #blacksciencefiction #blackspeculativearts #blackownedbanks #blackblueprint #afrofuturistagenda #afrofuturistnews

Book Review: ‘Blackspace: On the Poetics of an Afrofuture’ by Anaïs Duplan

“When Center for Afrofuturist Studies founding curator Anaïs Duplan first launched that initiative in Iowa City in 2016, he told Little Village, “It’s about making it safe to feel uncomfortable and then trying to make it better.”

That philosophy echoes throughout the twists and turns of his latest work, Blackspace: On the Poetics of an Afrofuture. As he explores the language and logic, ethics and esthetics of an Afrofuturist ideal, the idea of sitting with discomfort at the junctures of antithetical ideas keeps coming back into focus.”

Source: https://littlevillagemag.com/book-review-blackspace-on-the-poetics-of-an-afrofuture-by-anais-duplan/

#afrofuturism #blackmusic #blackjesus #blackentrepreneur #blackfuturist #xnubiaphi #afrophysicist #afronaut #afroscientist #afrochemist #afrobotanist #afrotechnology #afroexplorer #afrohorticulturist #blackgenius #blackengineers #NSBE #afroengineers #blacktothefuture #darkmatter #darkscience #theblackvote #afropoliticians #blacksciencefiction #blackspeculativearts #blackownedbanks #blackblueprint #afrofuturistagenda #afrofuturistnews